Archive for the ‘ADVICE’ Category

How to use social networks to get a job

Here’s a wake-up call for those of us hunting for jobs the old way.  Live the job you want on the Web. That’s right. Blog about it. Find potential employers on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook etc.  Think about how you present information about yourself. For example, calling myself an ex-Register business editor is — uhhh — old school, especially when my job was working on a Web site! (I thought highlighting that title would help me get a job, but it’s a probably a huge turn-off  because it’s linked to the newspaper industry.)scoble_medium

If it all sounds spooky because you don’t know how to do it or you’re not Web savvy — get over it and learn. That’s what a lot of us (including yours truly) have gotta do. So READ THIS from a dude known as Scobleizer. That’s blogger Robert Scoble, who is a video blogger for Fast Money.

So maybe you don’t agree with him, but it sure made a lot of sense to moi.

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Got a nifty job or job-search rant? Post it in comments or email me at dianachiyo@gmail.com


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Should you call — when job ad says “no calls”?

OK, I’ll circle back to the “should you ask why you didn’t get the job,” because I think most folks want to know, “should I call after I send in my application — even if it says no calls please.” darth_gimp_cordless_phone

This is frustrating. Sometimes you get an electronic response that your application has been received. But other times, nada. I’d applied for a job at an online company and signed up to get their newsletters — only to find that all of their newsletters were landing in my spam file. So — I tracked down the editor and simply asked if my materials were in the hopper with them — and not in their spam files. (They said “yes,” but I’ve heard nothing from them since.)

Here’s what CEO John Challenger at outplacement consultancy firm Challenger Gray & Christmas in Chicago says about dialing up a potential employer when the ad says “no calls”:

You should definitely respect that request.  Many companies that accept electronic resumes have an automatic response email to let you know that your resume has been received.  You can also follow up via email. That being said, responding to classified ads and online job postings, which is where you will most likely find the “no phone calls” request, should represent just a small portion of your job-search activity.  The bulk of your time should be spent expanding your network and meeting with people who can help you with your job search.  Many of the people you will meet with are not in a position to offer you a job, but what they can offer is access to more people who can help you.  Eventually, one of those people may connect you with someone who is actually hiring.  Through networking, you enter the hiring process through the side door as opposed to the front-door classified ad that attracts hundreds of other job seekers.

Coming next: If you don’t get the job, how do you ask why? Should you?

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Got a nifty job or job-search rant? Post it in comments or email me at dianachiyo@gmail.com


I got rejected! (Get used to it)

As a reporter, I’m used to rejection. I’m used to people telling me “no, no way, no how” am I gonna let you (fill in the blank here — but it’s usually interview or photograph) me.

CEO John Challenger

CEO John Challenger

But I received my first official job rejection letter in the mail the other day — and it caught me a little off-guard. I already knew I didn’t get the job because — as reporters tend to do — I kept dialing for updates and finally got the person on the phone and was told the job had been filled. But there it was — in black and white. And my heart fell. How many more times will this happen? So I emailed CEO John Challenger over at outplacement consultancy firm Challenger Gray & Christmas in Chicago.

I asked him how often should folks expect to be “rejected” from an employer in this climate? Here’s what he said:

Unfortunately, there is no established guideline or benchmark on how much rejection one will have to endure during his or her job search. This, of course, is what makes the job search so emotionally and psychologically draining, because there is no way to determine how far along in the process you might be at any given point.

The number of rejections is also relative to the number of interviews one is able to secure, and that varies widely based on the individual, the type of position being sought, the industry and the region in which one is conducting his or search. Even in this economy, the job search will most likely last three to six months. If at six months you are no closer to winning a new position, it may be necessary to consider taking a more aggressive approach or expanding your search to new cities and/or industries.

And I thought I’d faced rejection as a teen ….

Coming next: If you don’t get the job, how do you ask why? Should you?

Follow me: On Twitter under McDiana or on Facebook.

Got a nifty job or job-search rant? Post it in comments or email me at dianachiyo@gmail.com